FAQ

What is different about New Zealand beef

All NZ cattle are grass-fed, meaning, they free-range graze lush green pastures all year round and drink from clean free flowing streams.

The New Zealand environment is perfect for growing cattle with naturally good health requiring no nasty hormones and completely GMO Free.

Cattle raised in these conditions produce Beef that is less fatty and higher in omega three fatty acids

Why is grass fed beef better for jerky

Grass fed beef is typically lower in fat. Jerky is essentially dried meat, fat does not dry well, hence the leaner the beef the better the jerky.

What is free range beef

Free range beef is meat that comes from cattle that are free to roam the paddocks & eat pasture, versus cattle that are fed grain & growth promotants to create rapid weight gain, & are typically raised in feed lots.

What is gmo or non-gmo

GMOs, or “genetically modified organisms,” are plants or animals that have been genetically engineered with DNA from bacteria, viruses or other plants and animals. These experimental combinations of genes from different species cannot occur in nature or in traditional crossbreeding.

Virtually all commercial GMOs are engineered to withstand direct application of herbicide and/or to produce an insecticide. Despite biotech industry promises, none of the GMO traits currently on the market offer increased yield, drought tolerance, enhanced nutrition, or any other consumer benefit.

Meanwhile, a growing body of evidence connects GMOs with health problems, environmental damage and violation of farmers’ and consumers’ rights.

Most developed nations do not consider GMOs to be safe. In more than 60 countries around the world, including New Zealand, Australia, Japan, and all of the countries in the European Union, there are significant restrictions or outright bans on the production and sale of GMOs.

Non gmo means no genetically modified organisms.

The only 3rd party verification program in the USA is non-gmo project.

NZJ has received non gmo verification on all 3 of our products.

More information can be found here

Why is non-gmo beef better

A growing body of evidence connects GMOs with health problems, environmental damage and violation of farmers’ and consumers’ rights.

Most developed nations do not consider GMOs to be safe. In more than 60 countries around the world, including Australia, Japan, and all of the countries in the European Union, there are significant restrictions or outright bans on the production and sale of GMOs. In the U.S., the government has approved GMOs based on studies conducted by the same corporations that created them and profit from their sale. Increasingly, Americans are taking matters into their own hands and choosing to opt out of the GMO experiment.

More information can be found here:

Where is New Zealand

New Zealand (/njuː ˈziːlənd/; Māori: Aotearoa) is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. 12 hours by air from Los Angeles.

Is New Zealand joined to Australia by a bridge

No, that would have to be one heck of a bridge – from Auckland New Zealand to Sydney Australia is 2158.56kms or 1341.27 miles…

Are there really more sheep than people in New Zealand

Statistics New Zealand have stated Dec 2011 there were 4.42million people in New Zealand, & in June of that year the sheep population was estimated to be 31.1 million, so yes, more than 7 x more sheep than people…

* http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/population/mythbusters/3million-people-60million-sheep.aspx

Why don’t you make sheep jerky

Jerky is essentially dried meat, & fat does not dry well, lamb traditionally contains a much higher fat content & is therefore less conducive to producing a good jerky.

Do you even have cows in New Zealand

Yes, we do have cows, we have a lot of cows…Statistics New Zealand have stated that there are more than 10 million cows (cattle – beef & dairy) in New Zealand as at 2011, that’s more than twice as many cows as people!

* <http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/population/mythbusters/3million-people-60million-sheep.aspx